LIGHTHOUSE BEACH LANDCARE PROJECT

Regenerating the Wildlife Corridor at Lighthouse Beach

This project builds on 20 years of volunteer work by a Dunecare group led by Steve Cartwright. They encourage natural regeneration, by minimising disturbance as they remove the introduced species that threaten biodiversity. This in turn stabilises the sand dunes.

The work is enhancing Lighthouse Beach’s connection with Sea Acres Nature Reserve to the north, and Christmas Bells Plain/Lake Innes Nature Reserve to the south.

Native plants on the dunes include Coast Banksia, Coastal Wattle, Coastal Teatree, Pigface and the edible Wild Spinach. Coast Banksia is a keystone species that creates conditions for the regeneration of Littoral Rainforest, which is gradually spreading along the beach from the north.

This regeneration was recommended by the Bill Peel Bushland Review to provide security against sea level rise and coastal recession associated with climate change. Littoral Rainforest has state and federal significance, so the site has attracted Caring For Our Country funds. Recently corporate sponsor Barefoot Radler contributed $10,000 to the site.

Restoring the corridor will benefit sedentary and migratory birds, and animals such as grey-headed flying foxes, which feed on the Banksia flowers in winter. In turn they help to spread seeds and regenerate the bush.

Lighthouse Beach Dunecare are helped by Council, contract bush regenerators, Green Gym and school students, who are learning about coastal vegetation and the impacts of climate change.

Neighbours will be engaged too, using “Grow Me Instead” brochures to explain the impact of garden escapes and the advantages of growing natives.

This reserve has been returned to Council Natural Resources Section's Bush Regeneration Team for ongoing maintenance, with some assistance from Landcare.

Volunteers stand proud (and crouch)


St Columba's Students lend a hand